Thoughts About Miracles

When last I reported on my physical condition, I had been laid out by the chemo drug Carboplatin, which once again caused my bladder to become inflamed. After about 3 weeks of living in the bathroom, things slowly returned to normal. My doctor put me on a short break from chemo altogether, and from Carboplatin forever. According to him, he has never had a patient with this problem before! How special I felt! He advised me there are other forms of platinum that could be used. He recommended an older platinum drug that they used to use, CISplatin, which he remarked, caused more nausea, “but with the new anti-nausea drugs it shouldn’t be a problem.”

So two weeks ago (Tuesday) I received that drug (which takes twice as long to infuse), and my other two tumor suppressors. I was there from 11:30 to 5:30! The good news is my bladder tolerated it just fine. The bad news? I was pretty strung out with nausea and fatigue from Thursday to Monday. Not so bad that I had to throw up or anything, but bad enough that it kept me awake one night. So, a new challenge to face, but I’m feeling fine now, which makes you forget the bad. My tumor marker was at 41 that day which is just slightly high so my body is hanging in there despite missing alot of chemo treatments.

I’ve been thinking and studying about miracles, and pondering why couldn’t I be healed like the faith-filled woman with the blood issue that just touched Jesus’ garment and was instantly healed. As with most things in life, there is no easy answer. But there is alot of food for thought out there which calms my troubled heart. After reading Elder Donald Hallstrom’s conference talk ( https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2017/10/has-the-day-of-miracles-ceased?lang=eng) I had a different perspective on miracles. He asks, “Do we have the faith not to be healed from our earthly afflictions so we might be healed eternally? Is our faith focused on simply wanting to be relieved of pain and suffering, or is it firmly centered on God the Father and His holy plan and in Jesus Christ and His atonement?”

He suggests that we are “living a miracle”–that being a child of God, receiving a body in his image, the gift of a Savior and his atonement, and eternal life are all part of the miracle of this life. This got me thinking about other miracles I’ve experienced in my life. The biggest one is that angel sitting on my lap in the above picture. My granddaughter was born with several heart defects and had two open heart surgeries in the first 6 months of her life. Had she been born in an earlier generation these would have been lethal and we never would have experienced Abbey. She is a daily walking miracle and how grateful I am to know her!

I can think of at least two experiences in my life when I could have died if things had gone differently, but was “miraculously” saved. One occurred when I was home during summer break from college. We were at a family reunion at Laguna Beach, California. I went out into the surf to take a dip. I spent most of my growing up years frolicking in the waves of Huntington Beach to the north, where the beaches are wide open and the waves tamer and farther out. This little bay in Laguna had bigger waves and hit closer to shore. I tried my best to get inbetween the crashing waves but was caught flatfooted at just the wrong moment and received the full weight of a large wave which knocked me over and spun me around a few times. When I finally recovered enough to gather which way was up, and get a breath of air there was another one just like the last, breaking on top of me. I endured this bashing for another couple of rounds and knew I had to move toward shore quickly because I was running out of energy. By the time I finally made it to shore and collapsed onto my towel, I had never felt so drained in my life. I tried to tell my dad I almost died but it sounded a little over the top, even to me. But I have never forgotten that moment!

The other incident happened when me and my girlfriend were travelling by car to her hometown in Texas. We shared a ride with a couple of strangers and took turns at the wheel on the long trip. It was my turn, during the daylight, when I was driving on a lonely two-way road in the middle of nowhere and everyone else in the car was asleep. I noticed in the distance what appeared to be an 18-wheeler big rig traveling in my lane. It didn’t look like he was passing anyone, and it was far enough away that I wasn’t sure if I was imagining it or what. The closer he got, the more it seemed as if he certainly was in my lane, so I just slowly pulled off to the side of the road and stopped. Sure enough, zoom! he drove right by me in the wrong lane. This woke up the rest of the car, and we all marveled at the close call.

I think of some other high risk activities I did with strangers whom I trusted in my young adult years and also think of how bad they could have turned out. I have had 62 years of a miraculous and glorious life. God has a plan for us all. We are all going to die at some point, and it behooves us to trust in a higher power that knows the end from the beginning.

Not Again!

Knowing already that the cancer had returned, I was unenthusiastic, but willing, to meet with my oncologist the end of October. He expressed his sorrow for my current plight but offered some hope for the future. When discussing the prognosis, he said that the worst case scenario would be 2 years, and the best case would be 5+ years. He likes to tell me about one of his patients who is going strong after 10 years. The next step was to get another CT scan to see exactly what the cancer was doing and then follow up with him the week after.

I had the scan and the results were online the next day. I’ll skip the details because they are hard for my family to hear, but “extensive metastatic disease” summarizes it pretty much. It was difficult to believe the extent of the growth after just 10 months off of chemo and only 6 months since my last good tumor marker. I was interested to hear from the doctor if this is what he expected with a CA-125 (tumor marker) of 81. After all, when I was first diagnosed it was 600-something!

Soon after, I met with my oncologist. Yes, he was surprised at the extent of the growth of the cancer but assured me that the prognosis was the same. The next step was to get another chemo port put in my chest. At this point, I wish I had kept the old one since I didn’t want to go in for another outpatient surgery. But I did. And the following week I started chemo treatments again. This would involve receiving one of the drugs I got in the first round, namely Carboplatin, a platinum drug that kills cancer cells. New drugs I would be receiving are Gemzar and Avastin which control the growth of tumors. I would receive the first two once every three weeks and the latter, the first and second week of the 3-week cycle. I felt improvement in my symptoms (pain and getting full quickly) soon after starting. I had two cycles of chemo before Christmas and was actually feeling almost normal. The oncologist granted me a break from chemo for two weeks so I would feel good over Christmas. I traveled to Washington to spend the holiday with family and it was a delightful pick-me-up as my daughter got me interested in bullet journaling. I came home filled with hope and a desire to be engaged in life and accomplishing my goals in whatever time frame the good Lord was willing to grant me.

I started my third cycle of chemo on December 31st and upon waking to a new year, I was hit by a ton of bricks. The horrendous bladder condition I suffered in the first round had made its glorious return–only worse. Pain, blood, leakage and having to go every 15 minutes greeted me in the new year. Not again! I really had not been too concerned about it returning since I was receiving different drugs (except for the carboplatin)  which were not to be as harsh. But return it did. I can’t explain what it is like to try and sleep and live under such circumstances. Hell rings a bell. I made an appointment with my oncologist to discuss this and make new plans. He is giving me a couple of weeks off of chemo and then will try an alternative drug to the carboplatin next time.

The good news is I have started to get some relief. The bleeding has stopped, the pain has lessened and I am able to hold it much longer, and sleep for up to 2 hours at a time. That may not sound great to some, but it is heavenly to me!

 

Chemo Complications

This is Izzy, my Shih Tzu, modeling what I referred to as my “cancer hat.” I bought it at the wig store. It went down farther in the back than a regular ball cap to cover more of my baldness. As I mentioned in my previous post, when I started losing my hair I just had it all shaved off which made wearing the wig easier. I much preferred wearing a hat out in public and really didn’t mind that much but more often than not, just wore a ball cap. The wig was fine, but some of my hair growth at the sides would show through at times, so I was always worried about trying to keep everything in place.  Remember that when purchasing a wig. I bought mine well before I lost my hair so I would be ready. When you lose your hair, you lose it all over your body. It made me feel like my entire body was wrapped in Saran Wrap–not a pleasant sensation. But it also meant I didn’t have to worry about shaving my legs or plucking my face for an extended period of time. Be grateful for what you can be grateful for at this time!

I always thought that losing my hair would be the worst of all the complications I could face, and it was close but not the winner. In early October 2017 after I had been on chemo for about a month, I started having frequent urges to urinate. I brought this up at my appointments and of course they figured it was a urinary tract infection (UTI) and did tests to pinpoint the suspected bacteria. Every test they did indicated there was no infection. This is one time you wish there WAS an infection because there would at least be a treatment and explanation for it! Not only did I constantly have the urge to go, I also lost the ability, again, to keep it from leaking out. I had some pain when going, but it felt more like pressure in my bladder. It was getting worse and worse. I was having the urge to go about every 30 minutes. Try to sleep with that constant wake up call! They sent me to a urologist and I saw the nurse practitioner who, without touching or examining me in any way diagnosed “overactive bladder.” You gotta be kidding me. I didn’t believe for a minute that is what it was because you don’t go from normal to ridiculous, overnight. He gave me some samples of a medication that so completely dried out my mouth that I couldn’t function. It didn’t work either. I searched the internet for some insight into what was going on, and nothing seem to fit my symptoms, although I eventually convinced myself I had a prolapsed bladder. I didn’t. So anyway, I suffered tremendously for several months. If this was how I had to live, I didn’t want to live. Mentally, it took it’s biggest toll on me, far more than even the cancer diagnosis. I couldn’t go anywhere without searching for a bathroom constantly. My oncologist just couldn’t believe it was caused by the chemo because it was such a rare thing to happen.

I was so angry about the trip to the urologist that I didn’t want to go back, but my tortured existence finally got to me and I called for another appointment–but not with the caretaker I had before! It would be another 8 weeks before I could get in. My next appointment (with a different nurse practitioner) went much better, and she got me in quickly for a real examination with the female doctor I requested. She went into my bladder with a camera (pretty much pain free thankfully) and did see an area of inflammation. She said it didn’t look like cancer but wanted to do an outpatient procedure to go in and scrape the area for a biopsy. This happened in January 2018. The biopsy showed no cancer, just inflammation. It was about this time that my symptoms seemed to be easing up a bit anyway. She had me taking samples of a newer medication for active bladder, Myrbetriq, which did not have the drying side effects of the first medication. It didn’t bother me, but it didn’t change my symptoms when I started taking it and when I stopped taking it.  So, overall, I just got better with time. Eventually, the oncologist had to admit that it was probably due to the chemotherapy given the timing of it. Again, this is very rare, and not to be expected with Taxol and Carboplatin, but you never know what can happen.

It wasn’t until the last month or two of chemo that I started experiencing the promised neuropathy in my feet and fingers. I described my symptoms as “hot fingers” because that is what it felt like. They were hot at the tips, losing feeling, and looked as if someone bashed them with a 2×4 with dried blood underneath the nails. I took a picture of them to send to somebody but deleted them off my phone. Too bad. A friend commented on how horrible they looked so to spare people the sight, I painted them over with some tan fingernail polish–something I don’t usually use. I recovered most of the feeling in my fingertips but not completely and the ugliness soon went away. My feet went numb in the last month of treatment. It is not painful, just annoying, and this has not gone away.

Next up, life after chemotherapy…