Experimenting

As I approach the 2 year anniversary of my ovarian cancer diagnosis and surgery, I find myself experiencing mixed emotions. Vexation, of course, over the loss of my once good health and stamina, and gratitude for the extra time I have been given to learn and grow and accomplish many good things. Two weeks ago a lovely, gifted woman I know who was 39 years old and expecting the imminent birth of her fourth child suffered an amniotic fluid embolism. As I understand it, it is a rare complication of pregnancy in which the amniotic fluid somehow gets into the mother’s bloodstream. Both she and the baby passed away quickly. She left behind three small children and a grieving husband and family. In the grand scheme of life, that ranks up there among the most tragic heartbreaks one can endure. My disease at my age, and the time I’ve been granted to wrap things up, does not compare. Perspective is a great gift.

I left off my last post indicating that I was starting a new, unconventional drug that I had read about online. Here is the link to the post that got me started on it: https://www.mycancerstory.rocks

To summarize, this man Joe Tippins, about my age, was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2016. He did the traditional chemo and radiation treatments, but ultimately the cancer metastasized to other parts of his body and he was given 3 months to live. He was told by a veterinarian to try something called Fenbendazole, which is traditionally used to treat canine worms (this is why my dog Izzy takes top billing this post). Anyway, he started taking this drug along with a few other supplements and has been free from cancer ever since. He doesn’t sell it, so he is not making money off of this, just trying to share what happened to him in hopes that it might help others. I became interested in trying it because it has been tested on humans for other things, so it is safe, it is available online without a prescription and doesn’t cost that much. So, with all of that in mind, what have I got to lose?

I started taking it on June 3. I had an appointment with my oncologist shortly after this. We had discussed my current status and the fact that I had been rejected for the one study. He disagreed with my assessment that I had few options left, showing me a long printout of all of the drug trials for ovarian cancer I could get involved in, but thought we should just continue with the maintenance drug Avastin for now. My last tumor marker was in the 40s, so it wasn’t too bad. I saw this as my chance to tell him about the drug I was starting to take and see what he thought. He immediately did a search on his computer regarding the drug (he did not read the above link, which as a member of the medical profession I understood, and approved!) and found an article in a medical journal describing the anti-cancer mechanisms of the drug. He said it worked in the same way some of the traditional chemo drugs work. He was all for me trying it and said he had never heard of it before! Wow, a doctor with an open mind! He is always good about making a plan that we both agree on. The plan was to continue Avastin, and try the “fenben” through August, then have a new CT scan done. I asked if he would test my tumor marker every time I came in (every 3 weeks) so I could see if anything was happening and he agreed.

So it has been about 7 weeks now since I started the drug, but unfortunately I’m not seeing great results. My tumor marker on 6/11 was 53, 7/2 was 67 and the most recent on 7/23 was 79. It could be too early yet as they say it will take 10-20 weeks sometimes to see results. I think the original Joe saw results pretty quickly however. So it’s discouraging but I will continue on it for a while longer. My next scan will be the end of August.

Throughout this time I have been tracking my cancer symptoms in my bullet journal so I can get a better idea visually of what is happening physically to me. The two biggest symptoms are fatigue (although this could be due to the Avastin) and a stabbing pain I get in my side at times. Neither have changed much, but have probably gotten a little worse over the past 2 months. At any rate, I enjoy the things I’m able to do such as reading and doing family history work. I will report back again after my scan and meeting with the oncologist. Hope you are having a great summer!

5 thoughts on “Experimenting

  1. I think & pray for you everyday!
    You are a very strong lady that I have always admired still do.
    Waiting to take you to lunch or bring it to you sweetie.
    Lov ya,

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  2. First of all, I love the picture of Izzy!!! So so cute! Dogs are just so much love!! For us and for them. I’m sad that this new drug isn’t helping you quickly. I hope it does help and fast! You are amazing and I put your name in the temple last night. i love you and miss you and want to hang out soon!

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  3. I have read your story all in one sitting and I have to tell you that you are a gift. Sharing your journey, your faith and your experience is a beautiful legacy to those who read it. I will keep you in my prayers and please know that you’ve touched my heart deeply. You are an amazing woman, mother, grandmother and friend and I admire your strength. God bless you and your beautiful soul.

    Liked by 1 person

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