Next Step: Drug Trials

My last chemotherapy treatment was March 26. I again received the old platinum drug, Cisplatin plus my other two tumor shrinkers. I was to return a week later for one drug, but was still feeling sick from the week before, so I cancelled. I decided during that miserable week that I would rather die than be that sick for that long again, and so I was not going to take anymore platinum drugs. My symptoms included nausea for more than a week, exhaustion, headache, acid reflux, decreased appetite and increased hiccups.

By last week I felt well enough to take a trip to Texas (this time by plane) to visit my sister again. The above picture is of the bluebonnets that bloom in the spring in Texas. They were growing all over by the side of the roads and in fields, along with Red Indian Paintbrush flowers. Spring has a way of making a person feel new and hopeful again, and that it did. Plus seeing my sister and brother-in-law brought much joy and renewal to my heart. The day I returned home I was scheduled for a CT scan to see what, if any, difference my six cycles of chemotherapy made to my burgeoning metastatic cancer. CT scans have a way of bringing you back to the untoward reality of life no matter what season of the year it is.

If you’ve never had a CT scan, let me describe the process to you. The technician brings out a jug of “lemonade”, only it’s not lemonade, it is a yucky-tasting solution that you are instructed to drink every 20 minutes for about an hour. This time it was red, and the technician informed me it was raspberry lemonade and tasted much better. That turned out not to be true, as I found myself involuntarily shuddering with each gulp I took. I was then led into a dressing room and instructed to put on a gown and a pair of no metal scrubs-type bottoms. Why don’t they ever tell you which way the gown goes on, and if the ties go in the back how on earth you are to tie them by yourself?

Next stop is the freezing scan room where they must access a vein. This time I have my chemo port so they don’t have to poke me numerous times in an attempt to find a working vein. Or so I thought! The nurse was anxious to tell me how experienced she was with accessing ports but all it took was one painful jab which missed the mark to know she was talking like that to convince herself. She tried again and missed again. So now we must move on to finding a vein in my arm. I told her last time they needed to use the ultrasound machine to identify a useable vein, and she assured me she would do that. This attempt showed more of where her expertise lay, as it was a perfect, no pain stick of success!

Now they are ready to do the scan. They send the dye, or “contrast” through the IV which you can actually feel go throughout your body because it feels warm. I had two views done–the chest area, and the abdomen. The machine tells you when to hold your breath and be still, then when to exhale. Your arms are placed over your head and the platter you are on is moved through the machine. Maybe everybody else is used to that position, but I’m not, and it is painful to me to be in that position for long.

Although I had never had post-scan diarrhea before, this time it hit me hard about the time I got home and continued for two days. So, yes, the joys of CT scans are just innumerable!

The reports were actually available on line in just a couple of hours. The chest report indicated “numerous low-attenuation lesions in liver and abdominal peritoneum with significant increase compared to previous scan” done in October 2018. Well, that didn’t sound too good. The abdominal scan measured specific tumors identified on the previous scan, and all of them were smaller than they were before. So I was a little bit confused as one seemed to indicate improvement, and the other sounded worse.

I met with my oncologist yesterday, and was anxious to hear what he had to say about this contradiction. Well, the reports, he pointed out, were done by two different doctors. Okay but why are they seeing different things? He said he trusted the abdominal report more because of the measurements, and it generally gives a more accurate look at the tumors. At any rate, he was not thrilled with the results after 6 rounds of chemo. I think he called them “disappointing.” But, of course, he has more tricks up his sleeve. The next step is to look at some clinical trials they are doing right now with drugs to treat ovarian cancer. The first one we talked about was only for patients that have a specific protein in their tumors. That involves getting a biopsy of a tumor and testing it. And that is before you even begin to think about what is involved in the actual trial. Sigh. I do know one thing about the trial–it requires frequent scans. Double sigh and eye roll.

4 thoughts on “Next Step: Drug Trials

  1. Marcia you are an inspiration. I’m so sorry for all you are going through and I will keep you in my prayers and I will add your name to the temple when I go every Saturday. Hang in there and keep us posted.

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