Contemplating the Whys

I’ve never been much of a “Why me?” type of thinker in my life. In fact, I most often lean in favor of Murphy’s law–that if anything can and will go wrong, it will happen to me. I must admit however, that this cancer thing took me by surprise. At the end of each year at work, we had been given the opportunity to change our insurance coverage, and lately they were offering “cancer insurance” as an option. In 2016 I gave it a fleeting thought and decided “Nah–I’m good.” The reason? I have lived a pretty healthy lifestyle the majority of my life. I never have smoked, drank alcohol, taken illicit drugs or lived dangerously in any way. Three years after my daughter was born, I started exercising, lost a bunch of weight and continued as a consistent runner for almost 25 years. The year before my diagnosis I ate more cucumbers (daily) than I had eaten in my entire 60 years previous. And we who follow social media know that cucumbers are cancer killers! So with all of that dangerous knowledge behind me I thought I was safe.

I did fit a higher-risk profile for ovarian cancer in that I was over 55 and had been a “poor reproductive performer” having had only one child. But darn it, so do a gazillion other women and they never got or get ovarian cancer! It is almost impossible to get cancer and not ask yourself what you did to cause it because we, as humans, want to attach blame to someone or something, including ourselves. We want answers. I could see right away the futility of such thinking because there are no concrete answers. My life ending sooner than most has little to do with talcum powder or risk percentages, but has everything to do with how I face it and who I become as a result. This is where my core being as a child of God and faith in a loving creator who has sent us to earth for a divine purpose comes in. To me, it is impossible to talk about the “whys” of life without it.

If you’ve searched the internet for ways of dealing with ovarian cancer, you’ve likely come across treatment plans, chemotherapy, diets, supplements and pills. This is probably the only place you’re going to find spiritual fodder to digest. So, stick with me.

My insights come from a Christian, Latter-day Saint perspective. (https://www.mormon.org) We come to earth to be tested, to learn to overcome our weaknesses and imperfections, to repent and to become more like our Savior, Jesus Christ. You can’t achieve that if your life is easy, so life was never meant to be easy or what we as humans deem to be “fair.” Cancer is never fair, especially when it involves a child. It is impossible to enumerate the number of injustices we will come across in our lifetime, but it is part and parcel of our earthly experience. Therefore, how we face such trials means everything. Will I trust in the Lord who knows everything or do I lean on my own pitiful understanding of eternity? Will I take this perceived injustice and turn it into anger and resentment or will I continue on the path of love and faith?

We are not left alone to fend for ourselves. Christ promises us that with faith he will be with us to provide strength and peace in our lives. He knows us individually. I delight in the scripture that tells us he knows even when a sparrow falls to the ground. (Matt 10:29) If he knows that, he knows my sufferings and that comforts me.

In my next blog I will look at miracles. If I’m such a believer, how come I haven’t been miraculously healed?

 

 

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