Life After Chemotherapy

One common misperception about chemo is that most people lose weight. Some do, I’m sure, but between the fatigue and inactivity, and my habit of eating to fend off mild nausea, I ended up gaining about 20 pounds. Prior to my diagnosis I was an avid runner for 23 years, year round, no breaks. It helped me keep my weight down, and my body got used to it. During my time on chemo I was lucky to walk the dog one mile a day. By December, when I was needing blood transfusions to keep going, I rarely walked at all. It doesn’t take much for me to gain weight.

My last day of chemo was January 2, 2018. I rang the bell loudly on my way out and received the cheers of everyone in the unit. I was scheduled for a CT scan a couple of weeks following that and an appointment with the oncologist. Everything looked good and my next appointment was made for April. He informed me that the first thing to improve would be my labs, which meant increased energy levels. The next thing to come back would be my hair, and finally, perhaps the neuropathy in my fingers and feet. We discussed my chemo port and in the spirit of optimism about my future, I was adamant about getting it taken out. He didn’t try to talk me out of it.

I thought about how best to spend my time initially in recovery before the chemicals slowly left my body. As a runner there are always times when you get injured and need to cope with that, and my philosophy was to ask myself, well, what CAN I do? That’s when I headed to the gym to exercise using body parts that weren’t hurting until the injury was healed. So, I figured I could do some things on the computer, and in the two to three months time I was sidelined, I accomplished an amazing amount of family history work in research and downloading pictures for future generations. I went through my recently departed husband’s files and shared hundreds of photographs online that he had stashed away.  So despite my physical deprivations, it turned out to be a marvelous and inspiring couple of months.

At the beginning of March I decided to start a new exercise program at the gym. I started slowly with a stationary bike and treadmill for walking and slowly increased the pace and distance. I was loving this new me and getting my mojo back, and losing weight too!

I saw my oncologist in April and my tumor markers were still in a good place. He said my hair growth was about 3 weeks behind most people at the same point. I was getting very frustrated with what I perceived as an exteremely slow growth of my hair, and this confirmed that it truly was not coming back as I had hoped.

Looking ahead to the summer and what I could do to grab hold of a good time in my life with an uncertain future, I perused the motorhome ads for a small, class B vehicle that would be just right for me and Izzy. I so enjoyed the time camping and RVing with my husband a few years ago that I wanted to recapture the magic and be able to go kayaking as well.

IMG_0797This is the motorhome I ended up purchasing in April. My first trip was to Waco, Texas to visit my sister and her husband who had just moved there from California. Although I don’t necessarily love long road trips I figured if I just drove 4-5 hours a day and camped in cities along the way I’d be fine. Most people thought I was crazy to be driving across the country by myself. When you are facing a cancer diagnosis like mine, there is not much to be afraid of. The featured picture above is me on this trip, eating at the Magnolia Table in Waco with my sister and brother-in-law. It was great to spend time with them and the motorhome performed splendidly over the hundreds of miles I drove.

Next time I’ll talk about some struggles through the rest of the summer and my follow up with the oncologist in October.

3 thoughts on “Life After Chemotherapy

  1. Thanks for making the effort to publish a well-written post, Marcia. I learned more about you and was inspired by your frank optimism!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s